Press reports ISS success of Chertsey Radio Club

Press reports ISS success of Chertsey Radio Club

 

International Space Station

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

The Surrey press report radio amateurs at the Chertsey Radio Club received test transmissions by two satellites inside the International Space Station (ISS). The club also received ISS Slow Scan Television images.

On July 5, the Space Station sent greeting messages in Russian, English, Spanish and Chinese, which were picked up by club members. The messages were sent during test transmissions from two small educational Russian amateur radio satellites, known as Tanusha-1 and Tanusha-2. They will be deployed from the ISS during a spacewalk in August.

As part of the celebrations for the 20th Anniversary of Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS), the ISS sent a set of 12 images using slow scan television (SSTV). The transmissions took place over four days from July 20.

Chertsey Radio Club member James Preece M0JFP was able to receive the signal and convert them into images using a Raspberry Pi 3.

Read the article at
http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/surrey-news/surrey-radio-enthusiasts-make-contact-13396651

Chertsey Radio Club ISS SSTV on Raspberry Pi
http://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/iss-sstv-decoded-on-raspberry-pi3.html
http://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/iss-sstv-0058-uk-celebrating-20-years.html

Follow Chertsey Radio Club https://twitter.com/chertseyRC

Summer is a great time to get publicity for amateur radio
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2017/june/summer-is-a-great-time-to-get-publicity-for-ham-radio.htm

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a short Amateur Radio Foundation training course at https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

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437 MHz Sprite satellites deployed

437 MHz Sprite satellites deployed

 

437 MHz Sprite Satellite

437 MHz Sprite Satellite

Scientific American magazine interviews radio amateur Zac Manchester KD2BHC in the article Breakthrough Sends Smallest-Ever Satellites into Orbit.

On June 23, 2017 six tiny satellites were sent into low-Earth orbit as secondary payloads on the Venta and Max Valier satelites that were launched on the Indian PSLV-C38 rocket. These six satellites are comparatively dainty, but punch far above their weight. Called “Sprites,” each is a 4-gram flake of circuit-board just 3.5 centimeters on a side, packing solar panels, computers, sensors and communications equipment into an area equal to a U.S. postage stamp.

One Sprite apiece is attached to the outside of each mothership — the Latvian Venta satellite and the Italian Max Valier satellite, the latter of which also holds four additional Sprites awaiting deployment into space as wholly independent spacecraft. Radio telemetry from minuscule magnetometers and gyroscopes on the deployed Sprites would then be used to track the spacecraft as they shift, spin and tumble, to better understand their orbital dynamics.

Signals on 437.325 MHz from at least one of the exterior-mounted Sprites have been received in California and New York.

Read the Scientific American article at
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/reaching-for-the-stars-breakthrough-sends-smallest-ever-satellites-into-orbit/

Zac Manchester KD2BHC had 104 Sprite satellites launched into orbit on board KickSat-1 on April 18, 2014 but the Sprites failed to deploy
https://amsat-uk.org/2014/04/18/successful-launch-of-kicksat-carrying-104-sprite-satellites/

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Packet Module status on board ISS

Packet Module status on board ISS

 

ARISS has received several reports stating that the packet radio system on ISS is down. Here is what we know and our current forward plan.

The packet system in the Columbus module started to act up late last week, sending only a beacon. The ARISS team requested a power recycle by the crew, and with that power recycle, the packet system appears to have stop functioning completely. Note that this unit has been on-orbit for 17 years. It was launched on the STS-106 Space Shuttle Atlantis mission in September 2000 and was built, tested and certified for flight about 20 years ago.

The ARISS team has had some extensive discussions on the way forward. We would first like to do some additional troubleshooting with the existing packet module. It will take some time (weeks) to develop troubleshooting procedures, get the procedures approved by NASA and then conduct the tests with the crew. This includes an additional power cycle. The turnaround time is much longer than usual because a new crew will soon be arriving on ISS. The current crew is focused on the new crew arrival and there will be about a one- to two-week transition after the new crew arrives. On the positive side, one aspect of our troubleshooting-a second power cycle-will occur automatically because ARISS is shut down during crew docking and turned on afterwards. However, there will be more to our troubleshooting than just the power cycle.

We have some additional plans with alternative solutions, but those are currently being discussed and prioritized within the ARISS team. All solutions will require international ARISS team coordination, additional procedures and crew interaction. People who have carefully followed ISS operations know that crew time continues to evolve with the more extensive research that is occurring on-board. Suffice it to say, it will take longer than what it has taken in the past to work through this issue.

The above information is to make sure that ARISS properly sets expectations on how long it will take to resolve this. At this point, expect a few months with no ARISS packet.

As you all can see, deploying the Interoperable Radio system that is currently under development by ARISS has become even more critically important. The ARISS team is laser focused on getting that system developed and deployed. We are conducting a final design review with NASA on this system next week. But we cannot get to the finish line without your help. If you can, please consider a donation to the ARISS radio fund by clicking on the ARISS donate button on the ARISS web page. All donations, large and small are appreciated http://www.ariss.org/donate.html

On behalf of ARISS, we thank you for your sustained interest and support of our program.

Sincerely,

Frank H. Bauer, KA3HDO
ARISS International Chair

About ARISS

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies and amateur radio.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://www.ariss.org/
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status
https://www.facebook.com/Amateur-Radio-on-the-International-Space-Station-ARISS-153679794647788/

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QIKCOM-1 team expect Eclipse day ISS deployment

QIKCOM-1 team expect Eclipse day ISS deployment

 

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA t

 

The US Naval Academy team say their amateur radio QIKCOM-1 APRS Digipeater payload may be deployed from the International Space Station on August 21.

The QIKCOM-1 page says:

The Ham Radio QIKCOM-1 module attached to the NovaWurks NanoRacks SIMPL spacecraft is now finally scheduled for release from the ISS on 21 August 2017!

This is being released on the same day as the solar Eclipse when the ISS will also be passing over the USA during the eclipse 2 hour window around 1800z. We are not clear on any correlation with the Eclipse and our release, but there will be lots of hams in the field and it is a good day to tune in!

Read about QIKCOM-1 at http://aprs.org/qikcom-1.html

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